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PRIVACY POLICY

The Norman Mailer Center & The Norman Mailer Writer's Colony

2014 Workshop List and Applications


01.

Creative Non-Fiction MORE INFO

Dates
Sat., July 12, 2014 — Sat., July 19, 2014
Instructor
Beverly Donofrio · Biography
Beverly Donofrio

Beverly Donofrio

Beverly Donofrio’s first memoir, Riding in Cars with Boys, has been translated into sixteen languages and transformed into a popular motion picture. Her second memoir, Looking for Mary (or, the Blessed Mother and Me), began as a documentary on NPR and was chosen as a Discover Book at Barnes & Noble.

Her first picture book, an award–winner, Mary and the Mouse, the Mouse and Mary, was illustrated by Barbara McClintock and appeared in 2007. The book’s sequel, also illustrated by Barbara McClintock, Maria and Mouse Mouse, Mouse Mouse and Maria, is scheduled to be released in 2013 Thank You, Lucky Stars, a book for middle–graders about dancing and friendship, appeared in 2008.

Beverly is an award–winning radio documentarian and essayist and can be heard on such programs as All Things Considered. Her personal essays have appeared in national newspapers and magazines, such as the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Allure, Cosmopolitan, New York Magazine, The Village Voice, O, Marie Clair, and Spirituality & Health.

She lived for four years as a lay Carmelite at Nada Hermitage in Colorado, where she began her next memoir, Astonished, which will be published by Viking in the spring of 2013. Beverly is now in transit, in the hallway, between here and there, a lay Carmelite out in the world, spending time with family and friends, writing as always, and teaching at the low residency MFA program at Wilkes University.

Course Description

This course will survey and analyze the craft and technique of narrative works developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of American novelists and journalists to apprehend and depict the extraordinary events of that period. The innovations of writers like Mailer, Talese, Wolfe, Didion and Capote changed the face of American narrative prose and continue to affect the way we perceive social reality. In preparation for the class, attendees will read an assigned section of pieces by the mandarins of the Creative Non-Fiction. During class week, you will employ some of the approaches encountered in your reading in workshop.

Application
Download the Application form (*.PDF)
02.

Screenwriting MORE INFO

Dates
Sat., July 19, 2014 — Sat., July 26, 2014
Instructor
David Black · Biography
David Black

David Black

David Black is an award-winning journalist, novelist, screenwriter, and producer. His novel Like Father was named a notable book of the year by the New York Times and listed as one of the seven best novels of the year by the Washington Post. The King of Fifth Avenue was named a notable book of the year by the New York Times, New York Magazine, and the A.P. Among the television shows he has produced and written are the Sidney Lumet series 100 Centre Street, which was listed as one of the ten best shows of the year, the Richard Dreyfuss series The Education of Max Bickford, and Monk, CSI-Miami, Hill Street Blues, Miami Vice, and Law & Order. He won the Writers’ Guild of America Award for The Confession. He received an American Bar Association Certificate of Merit for “Nullification,” a controversial episode of Law & Order about Militia groups, which The Los Angeles Times called an example of “the new Golden Age of television.” Among his other awards, he has received a National Endowment of the Arts grant in fiction, Playboy’s Best Article of the Year Award, Best Essays of the Year 1986 Honorable Mention, Forward’s Book of the Year Special Mention, and an Atlantic Monthly “First” award for fiction. He has also received a Pulitzer Prize nomination for The Plague Years, a book based on a two-part series that he wrote for Rolling Stone and that won a National Magazine Award in Reporting and the National Science Writers Award.  He has taught writing at Lehman College, Mt. Holyoke College, and Harvard, where he is a scholar-in-residence at Kirkland House. He is a former board member of the Mystery Writers of America and a member of the Century Association, the Williams Club, the Columbia Club, PEN, the Explorers’ Club, and the Players.

Course Description

A week long seminar on story-telling – how we tell stories and how the stories we tell affect how we behave. The stories we tell ourselves about politics shape our actions – as do the stories we tell about our friends, our family, and ourselves. The course will discuss how to become more conscious of the stories around us and how to use those stories in fiction, non-fiction, and screenwriting. The course will also discuss structure, POV, and shaping scenes – as well as the business of writing. How to pitch a TV series or movie, how to write a proposal for a book or magazine article.

Application
Download the Application form (*.PDF)
03.

Memoir: The Challenge of Depicting Live Characters MORE INFO

Dates
Sat., July 26, 2014 — Sat., August 2, 2014
Instructor
Kaylie Jones · Biography
Kaylie Jones

Kaylie Jones

Kaylie Jones newest endeavor is her publishing imprint with Akashic Books, Kaylie Jones Books. Her flagship publication is Laurie Loewenstein’s novel, Unmentionables (January 2014), which was honored at the ALA 2014 conference, and was a Midwest Booksellers Association January pick. Kaylie has published six books, the most recent a memoir, Lies My Mother Never Told Me (Harper Collins, 2009). Her novel A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries was adapted as a Merchant Ivory Film in 1998. Jones is the editor of the anthology Long Island Noir, published in Spring 2012. Her non-fiction essay, Judite is included in Ann Hood’s Knitting Yarns, published in November 2013. Kaylie has been teaching creative writing for more than 25 years, and is a faculty member in the Stony Brook/Southampton MFA Program in Writing, and in the Wilkes University Low-Residency Program in Professional Writing. Kaylie and her daughter spent the summer 2013 studying Kung Fu in China with Shaolin warrior monks.

Course Description

Many people have the talent to write excellent sentences; few have the understanding of how to structure a marketable book. This course will first and foremost address the issue of structure in memoir writing.  Other topics will include: how to get past the problems of truth versus fiction; how to attain equitability in addressing painful topics; how to get around problems of time sequencing and still remain true to facts; and how to achieve originality and emotional balance in the work.

Application
Download the Application form (*.PDF)
04.

Fiction: The Protagonists MORE INFO

Dates
Sat., July 26, 2014 — Sat., August 2, 2014
Instructor
Marita Golden · Biography
Marita Golden

Marita Golden

Marita Golden is an award-winning novelist, nonfiction writer, distinguished teacher of writing and co-founder of the Hurston/Wright Foundation, a national organization that serves as a resource center for African-American writers.

Marita Golden was born in Washington, D.C., in 1950 and attended the city’s public schools. She received a B.A. in American Studies and English from American University and a M.SC. in Journalism from Columbia University. After graduating from Columbia, she worked in publishing and began a career as a free-lance writer, writing feature articles for many magazines and newspapers including Essence Magazine, the New York Times, and the Washington Post.

Her first book, Migrations of the Heart (1983), was a memoir based on her experiences coming of age during the 1960s and her political activism as well as her marriage to a Nigerian and her life in Nigeria where she lived for four years.

She has taught at many colleges and universities, including the University of Lagos in Lagos Nigeria, Roxbury Community College,Emerson CollegeAmerican UniversityGeorge Mason University, and Virginia Commonwealth University. She holds the position of Writer in Residence at the University of the District of Columbia, in Washington, D.C. Previous Writer-in-Residence positions have been held at Brandeis UniversityUniversity of the District of ColumbiaHampton UniversitySimmons CollegeColumbia College , William and MaryOld Dominion University and Howard University. 

As a literary activist, she co-founded the Washington, D.C.-based African American Writers Guild, as well as the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Foundation, which serves the national and international community of Black writers.

Course Description
Thinking the Unthinkable.  Speaking the Unspeakable.  Secrets.  Regrets.  These are the actions and "elements" that make for riveting characters.  Vivid, hard to forget characters are memorable because of the complexity of their fears and desires.  Great characters jump off emotional cliffs, dive into the deep end of the ocean of their experience.  This workshop will focus on how to create protagonists that take up residence in the reader's life and memory and live there long after the reader has finished the last page
Application
Download the Application form (*.PDF)